BOOK’S #FOODIE: Styles P & Jadakiss put money in a juice spot for your health


If you have never had a healthy juice or smoothie, you do not know what you’re missing. Styles P and Jadakiss didn’t know what they were missing until things happened in their lives and discovered the health benefits of a juice made from natural ingredients. They both decided they would not only benefit others but also their community, a bit of “teach one, reach one” and they now have a juice spot called Juices For Life. It’s only in New York but with enough attention and recognition, maybe it will become a regional and eventually a national chain.

AUDIO: Peter Leo & Eitan Noyze featuring Styles P’s “So Superb”

When the words “boom bap” are used, it immediately brings to mind familiarities and comfortability. This is what Peter Leo and Eitan Noyze did when they created “So Superb”, they wanted to create that boom bap mentality and they did it nicely. They also included Styles P with them, and this is the result. You can hear more on the Energy Shift album.

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REVIEW: Jaecyn Bayne’s “Audio Therapy”

Photobucket Jaecyn Bayne is a rapper that sounds like that around the way cat that you can rely on for quality rhymes and flows, and he shows what he’s about on his album Audio Therapy. The therapy involved includes a number of rock and blues-rock instrumentals that are nice to hear in this context, as Bayne is someone who wants to go on a journey and take listeners along with him, just as the music does. Then you get into a song like “Heat Stroke” that sounds like they found the ghost of the Kashmere Stage Band, added Cut Chemist‘s beat selection into the mix, and went crazy. Then things get elevated when Keith Murray starts rhyming in “Heat Stroke” and you want to raise your hand and go “SHIT YEAH!”

It’s nice to hear an MC who is able to be musically diverse without fear, because too many want to be locked in a comfort zone and never get out of it. Jaecyn Bayne is a journeyman, welcome him into your village.

REVIEW: Pharoahe Monch “W.A.R. (We Are Renegades)”

Photobucket There was a time not too long ago when the lyrics of Pharoahe Monch was considered ahead of its time, futuristic, and yet as the music evolved into new eras, everyone loved him but so-called experts refused to rank him up there with alleged greats. Pharoahe Monch doesn’t need validation, although I’m sure there’s a bit of that ego in him which says “fuck that, of course I want that recognition” but having a hard work ethic has made him one of the best MC’s of the last 20 years. He is now making music in his third decade, how many people from back then can still sound “of the future” and “in the now” without people ever having to think of what came before?

Okay, maybe that last comment was kind of rude so let me say it differently. With quality artists, you always should acknowledge what came before, because they wouldn’t be what they are without everything that lead to it. Yet with his new album, Pharoahe still sounds like he’s speaking to people of the future, hoping for everyone to catch up someday and yet a lot of what he has been speaking about for the last 20 years is being realized today. W.A.R. (We Are Renegades) (W.A.R. Media/Duck Down) is a collection of songs that fits what some would call an audio movie. There are no interludes even though some of the tracks are as long as them. Instead, the pace of the album and how it’s programmed show how important the process of making music is for Pharoahe, as you get a sense of the horrid outlook he has on the world we live in, which maybe is a reflection of how we view ourselves. These songs are filled with metaphors and complexities that show classic Pharoahe, but by taking a deep listen to tracks like “Haile Selassie Karate”, “Let My People Go”, and “Calculated Amalgamation” you realize he has always been speaking like this, it’s just that he’s capable of looking for, exploring, and discussing new stories and ideas. This is the kind of hip-hop that seems perfect for sci-fi junkies, those who seek to use metaphors as ways to speak in code so that those easily offended will not realize they’re evil ways are being exposed. Yet you don’t have to hang out at Comicon’s or Dungeons & Dragons to understand what he’s talking about, he’s direct and to the point at times almost too direct but that’s how he cuts and soothes listeners at the same time. He knows he’s capable of saying something that will make fans go “wow, now this feels good, I sense something great here” while fans will put faith in him, knowing that he’s in control of his destiny and people admire the paths he’s willing to take.

In other words, W.A.R. is what The D.O.C. once called “Rhythmic American Poetry”, a/k/a the essence of R.A.P., a dialogue that isn’t just someone speaking out of his ass just because he admires the sound and smell of his own verbal farts. Pharoahe Monch is a communicator, and fortunately there are enough fans who put faith in what he does in order to keep hearing it year after year. As a hip-hop record, people need to listen to this and understand what proper programming and producing can do and sound like.

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VIDEO: Rick Ro$$ featuring Styles P’s “B.M.F. (Blowin’ Money Fast)”

http://videos.onsmash.com/e/kcY25dHpNkNJQ2c1
This is a song from Rick Ro$$‘ forthcoming album, Teflon Don, due out next week Tuesday. With some of the controversies surrounding Ro$$, I’m curious to see how fans will take to his new music. Perhaps Ro$$ himself expected some heat, the reason he named his album the way he did. In other words, whatever you throw his way, it’s not going to stick.

Or something like that.

http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?lt1=_blank&bc1=000000&IS2=1&bg1=FFFFFF&fc1=000000&lc1=0000FF&t=thisbosmu-20&o=1&p=8&l=as1&m=amazon&f=ifr&md=10FE9736YVPPT7A0FBG2&asins=B003IMES78