AUDIO: Stag’s “Midtown Sizzler”


When was the last time you’ve been to a Sizzler restaurant? When was the last time you visited the midtown Sizzler? Do you even have a Sizzler near you, or even a midtown? Maybe this song has nothing to do with either but Seattle’s Stag want to prove something to you with their track, grab a slice of Texas toast or don’t even bother to bring a fork. This is “Midtown Sizzler” and perhaps it is here for you to be satisfied in your own way. The full album will be out on August 4th,

REVIEW: Victorian Slang’s “By The Light Of The Moon”

 photo VictorianSlang_cover_zpslnorsoow.jpg It’s kind of a trip to hear a modern indie rock band have the appeal that is a cross between Weezer and Neil Young buit that is what I hear in the three-piece Victorian Slang, whose By The Light of The Moon (Emotional Response) is the kind of album that would sound great in a car as it would in a dingy basement with no air conditioning. “High Five The Moon” sounds like a country song in the wrong part of town while “Churches” is the right song to turn your melancholy into a happy day or week.

It’s not a majorly serious album but that’s not to say this is nothing more than a hoot and a guffaw. By The Light of The Moon has enough of a good thing going for it that they come off as a band who don’t take themselves too seriously, or at least they know how to have fun, especially by covering Clarence “Frogman” Henry’s “Ain’t Got No Home”, which Rod Stewart borrowed/ripped off for “Some Guys Have All The Luck” in the 80’s. Victorian Slang take it back from him and show things can still be good, if not great. Need a bit of an Uncle Tupelo revival, they pull it off with excellent by doing “I Got Drunk”. The album is quite nice and while calling something “nice” may come off as being tame, I mean that in the nicest way, no sarcasm. I’d want to see these guys live.

REVIEW: The Fireworks’ “Switch Me On”

The Fireworks photo TheFireworks_cover_zpseecnctof.jpg This album was in the pile of discs to review but as I was listening to it and really getting into the power of rock on this, I looked to find out when it was released: February 2015. I thought to myself “was this meant for review two years after the fact or was it something merely to listen to?” I then kept on listening and try to figure out what to do later.

The Fireworks are a British band and the muse of Switch Me On (Shelflife) sounds British too, at least musically. It reminds me of all of the great punk and alterna-rock of the late 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s, where I’m able to hear the influences but also able to share what these new bands are doing. The group alternates between male and female vocals to help balance the vibe The Fireworks are trying to do, whether it’s something that has a lot of charm and melody or if it totally rips into the gut without regret. The power and volume of the bass and guitar may come off as loud and vulgar but the songs tell a different tale, one of love found and a need to keep it together for everyone around. It reminds of me what Sleater-Kinney or Hüsker Dü were and are capable of doing, making sure to provide a music that’s a nice punch in a face but one that is followed with a warm hug.


REVIEW: Jim Of Seattle’s “Both The Planet Frank And The Chet Lambert Show”

The last time I heard from Jim Of Seattle, I compared them to the likes of Brian Wilson, Todd Rundgren, and Prince for their diversity and eclectic side. Eclecticness is still present on Both The Planet Frank And The Chet Lambert Show (Green Monkey) but now they’re getting in contact with Devo and Frank Zappa, the former quite present when they do a cover of “Whip It” but they also get into Jimmy Webb’s realm with a nice rendition of “Wichita Lineman”.

The album is divided in two halves, the eclectic side working as a radio show (The Elders Live From The Planet Frank) and a far more trippy side on the “other” (The Chet Lambert Show), both not coinciding with one another and yet somehow the differences fit perfectly. It plays along well with The Turtles Meet The Battle Of The Bands but they are (ahem) playing with themselves for an order to dominate their practice sheds. In other words, Jim Of Seattle are doing very well stuck in their own world and they’re more than happy to welcome others in for fun and musical joy.